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research-article

A 3D-Printed Patient-Specific Phantom for External Beam Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

[+] Author and Article Information
Christopher Lee

Mem. ASME, Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, 1000 Olin Way, Needham, MA 02492
christopher.lee@olin.edu

Max Dietrich

Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, 1000 Olin Way, Needham, MA 02492
Max.Dietrich@students.olin.edu

Uma Desai

Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, 1000 Olin Way, Needham, MA 02492
Uma.Desai@students.olin.edu

Ankur Das

Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, 1000 Olin Way, Needham, MA 02492
ankurd94@gmail.com

Suhong Yu

Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center & Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02118
suhong.yu@bmc.org

Hong Xiang

Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center & Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02118
hxiang2@lghealth.org

C. Carl Jaffe

Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center & Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02118
carl.jaffe@bmc.org

Ariel Hirsch

Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center & Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02118
Ariel.Hirsch@bmc.org

B. Nicolas Bloch

Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center & Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02118
nicolas.bloch@bmc.org

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040817 History: Received February 13, 2018; Revised July 05, 2018

Abstract

This paper presents the design evolution, fabrication, and testing of a novel patient and organ-specific, 3D printed phantom for external beam radiation therapy of prostate cancer. In contrast to those found in current practice, this phantom can be used to plan and validate treatment tailored to an individual patient. It contains a model of the prostate gland with a dominant intraprostatic lesion, seminal vesicles, urethra, ejaculatory duct, neurovascular bundles, rectal wall, and penile bulb generated from a series of combined T2-weighted/dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images. The iterative process for designing the phantom based on user interaction and evaluation is described. Using the CyberKnife System at Boston Medical Center a treatment plan was successfully created and delivered. Dosage delivery results were validated through gamma index calculations based on radiochromic film measurements which yielded a 99.8% passing rate. This phantom is a demonstration of a methodology for incorporating high-contrast magnetic resonance imaging into computed-tomography -based radiotherapy treatment planning; moreover, it can be used to perform quality assurance.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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